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in pakistan right now. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." first, a powerful reminder today, if they don't reach an agreement in the next 11 days, all hell could brea look. standard & poor's is warning the nation could be shoved back into recession very soon after the august 2i deadline passes with the clock ticking and stakes rising, our own jessica yellin learned that leaders plan to meet this hour at the white house. we're learning a good deal more about where the talks stand. kate bolduan has the latest. what do you know? >> both sides, all sides are cautioning and stressing that there is no deal. we are learning that president obama and house speaker john boehner are making a fresh drive to strive for one maybe last effort on this some of the ideas could include $3 trillion in debt reduction. that could include spending cuts of possibly a trillion or more, entitlement reform that could possibly include changing the age eligibility for -- of medicare, and also on the issue of revenues, there's discuss of whether the bush era tax cuts for higher income earners should expi
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
leaders in pakistan and yemen. >> i think we have them on the run. i think now is the moment. now is the moment following what happened with what happened to bin laden to put maximum pressure on them because, i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can cripple al-qaida as a threat to this country. >> and the secretary's schedule in afghanistan is packed and first the meeting with the top u.s. commander general petraeus here and holding a face to face with afghan hamid karzai. they want to with draw 23,000 troops. >> david piper is on the phone from kabul. >> the newly appointed defense secretary arrive went straight in the talks with afghan president karzai and he said the draw down of u.s. troops. he hopes to drive the taliban to peace talks in that period so there can be a reconcilation in this country and the defense secretary w upbeat about killing out al-qaida. >> targeting the new al-qaida chief saw al-zawahri. he said the al-qaida leader may be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas . general petraeus who leaves the post this month to lea
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn afghanistan. here at quicken loans, we like to go the extra mile for our clients. with the wassman family, it was 2,500 extra miles. we're the wassman family from skagway, alaska. livin' so far out and not
at the indian subcontinent, the population is 1.4 billion, same as china, which includes bangladesh and pakistan of it. it's a lot of people in a small area, but they're running out of water, particularly in india. they're overpumping their aquefers, their wells are running dry. and they're projected to grow by 1 million people in the years ahead. subsaharan africa has morelan l, but its population is growing very fast, and it doesn't have the resources to develop the productivity of the land fully. so that's the problem there. and the hunger and malnutrition in the world is concentrated in the indian subcontinent and subsaharan africa. >> do you think the rest of the world -- there's been a big call from the u.n. to say, we need to help these people. is there help available in the rest of the world with the economy teetering the way it is? a lot of countries saying we'd like to help. but we just can't. >> if it's just the horn of africa, 10 million people, 12 million people, that's large. if it becomes bigger and affects a number of countries, then it would be scramble time. the question is how
that are being persecuted in countries like pakistan. and we -- >> on of your business? that's interesting. investigation continues tomorrow night. what are we going to see tomorrow? >> reporter: tomorrow how he makes a business out of his expertise. how these donation toss his cause end up with a so-called foundation owned by his business partner. and also the bigger question, anderson, why are our taxpayers going to pay this guy? he can say whatever he wants, but where are the people vetting these so-called terrorism experts that are suddenly making a lot of money in this country? >> that's interesting. drew, fascinating. we'll continue to follow up. we'll have that report part two tomorrow. >>> coming up, you may not have been following the war in libya recently. but tonight you are going to get as close to the come bass as anyone can. our ben wedeman and his crew caught in the crossfire today. and the video of it is heart-stopping. >> guys? alec? as fast as we can. we can't tell who the -- >> going to show you the full video what happened. we'll talk to ben. he was able to get out, his
now for panetta is to keep attacking al qaeda in pakistan, yemen, and somalia. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort that we can really cripple al qaeda. as a threat to this country. >> the u.s. has long said it believes al qaeda remains very interested in high-profile attacks and would like nothing better than to bring down a u.s. aircraft. apparently, osama bin laden was even talking about assembling a team of operatives. but of course, those navy s.e.a.l.s killed him in the compound before he could carry out the plan any further. >> general petraeus, i take it is getting ready to leave afghanistan, heading over to the cia? >> very soon. in fact, the change of command ceremony that will turn everything over in afghanistan to marine corps general john allen will take place monday morning in kabul. petraeus will get on a plane, come back to the united states, retire from years of service in the active duty army, and, in fact, in the coming weeks will do exactly that. take over
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)